THE WALL OF US  has an express purpose: to project spoken words onto a corporal body in real time. This installation capitalises on the sensitivity of speech-to-text digital recognition software through the process of transliteration.
       
     
       
     
 Remembering and/or forgetting surround the praxis of embodied memory; and memory is attuned with temporality. The physicality and corporeal movements required by the participant in front of the mirror to ‘catch’ these projected words gives the conceptualization of remembering another dimension; that remembering words need not only be a mental activity but a physical activity as well. In other words, to have a conversation, to engage in a dialogue not only requires aural attention but is an action. This performative memory becomes an embodied memory.
       
     
 Can we embrace and struggle with the accuracy or imperfections of current speech-to-text recognition technology and question what is lost and gained through this fundamentally human exchange in linguistics? The Wall of Us coaxes the individual to contemplate beyond the many mis-translations and mis-readings that might accompany current digital technology during an aesthetic encounter. Hence, a mis-take (in this case) could be viewed as an opportunity, a genuine entry-point for sincere human-to-human interaction amidst a digital environment.
       
     
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  THE WALL OF US  was recently presented at  The Seventh International Conference on Interactive Digital Storytelling (ICIDS)  from 2-5 November 2014 at ArtScience Museum, Singapore.      
       
     
  THE WALL OF US  has an express purpose: to project spoken words onto a corporal body in real time. This installation capitalises on the sensitivity of speech-to-text digital recognition software through the process of transliteration.
       
     

THE WALL OF US has an express purpose: to project spoken words onto a corporal body in real time. This installation capitalises on the sensitivity of speech-to-text digital recognition software through the process of transliteration.

       
     

When our thoughts transpose themselves from spoken words into a mediated form (digital text) which then can be disseminated beyond our body’s locality, words are no longer static. THE WALL OF US highlights this paradigm shift in technology and aesthetics from the textual to the performative.

 Remembering and/or forgetting surround the praxis of embodied memory; and memory is attuned with temporality. The physicality and corporeal movements required by the participant in front of the mirror to ‘catch’ these projected words gives the conceptualization of remembering another dimension; that remembering words need not only be a mental activity but a physical activity as well. In other words, to have a conversation, to engage in a dialogue not only requires aural attention but is an action. This performative memory becomes an embodied memory.
       
     

Remembering and/or forgetting surround the praxis of embodied memory; and memory is attuned with temporality. The physicality and corporeal movements required by the participant in front of the mirror to ‘catch’ these projected words gives the conceptualization of remembering another dimension; that remembering words need not only be a mental activity but a physical activity as well. In other words, to have a conversation, to engage in a dialogue not only requires aural attention but is an action. This performative memory becomes an embodied memory.

 Can we embrace and struggle with the accuracy or imperfections of current speech-to-text recognition technology and question what is lost and gained through this fundamentally human exchange in linguistics? The Wall of Us coaxes the individual to contemplate beyond the many mis-translations and mis-readings that might accompany current digital technology during an aesthetic encounter. Hence, a mis-take (in this case) could be viewed as an opportunity, a genuine entry-point for sincere human-to-human interaction amidst a digital environment.
       
     

Can we embrace and struggle with the accuracy or imperfections of current speech-to-text recognition technology and question what is lost and gained through this fundamentally human exchange in linguistics? The Wall of Us coaxes the individual to contemplate beyond the many mis-translations and mis-readings that might accompany current digital technology during an aesthetic encounter. Hence, a mis-take (in this case) could be viewed as an opportunity, a genuine entry-point for sincere human-to-human interaction amidst a digital environment.

wos_11.jpg
       
     
wos_05.jpg
       
     
wos_06.jpg
       
     
  THE WALL OF US  was recently presented at  The Seventh International Conference on Interactive Digital Storytelling (ICIDS)  from 2-5 November 2014 at ArtScience Museum, Singapore.      
       
     

THE WALL OF US was recently presented at The Seventh International Conference on Interactive Digital Storytelling (ICIDS) from 2-5 November 2014 at ArtScience Museum, Singapore.